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Southern Shaolin Temple

The Southern Shaolin Temple, about 16 kilometers northwest from Putian City, was built in A.D. 557 the Southern Dynasties, 60 years after Songshan Shaolin Temple in Henan. Before that it had a old name Linquan Complex. As a big temple, the Linquan Temple had more than 20 buildings with more than 500 monks warriors living there according to the stone inscription.

Why did the monk warriors come to Linquan Complex in Putian from Songshan Shaolin Temple? The most popular answer was that the emperor required a military assistance from Songshan Shaolin Temple.

Later Li Shimin, the fisrt emperor of the Tang Dynasty, ascended the throng, the remaider of his enemy went on doing evil like pirates in Fujian. For the stability and prosperity in Southern China, the emperor could not send a army and needed special military operations of monk warriors. He resorted to the master of Songshan Shaolin Temple. Approximately 500 warrior monks, led by a legendary Shaolin cudgel fighting monk Dao Guang, were sent to Fujian to fight against the pirates in the early 7th Century.

The monk warriors used their special talents, eventually helped the local Tang soldiers to surpress the riot successfully, but quite a mumber of them died in the battle. When they were about to return to Songshan Shaolin Temple, the local people asked them for continuous protection. For the bury of the dead monks and the people's wish, Dao Guang and his warrior monks got the master's permission from Songshan Shaolin Temple and settled down in Linquan Complex in Putian. Simliar to Shaolin Temple, Linquan Complex was buit to be a southern branch, and then it was called Southern Shaolin Temple. By the Song Dynasty, the Southern Shaolin Temple became a center for the spread of Chan Buddhist philosophy and martial arts.

The Southern Shaolin temple was burned down once during the regime of Kangxi Emperor in the Qing Dynasty. The temple was a base for the movement of Ming restoration against the Manchu rulers at that time. Now the Southern Shaolin Temple you see was rebuit later.

Questions & Comments

  • trexler on January 14, 2013, 10:35 am

    i am an advanced practicioner studying chen in yiwu.it is cold here and i am older,get sick from trainining outside and inside buildings are not heated.i want a warmer climate to train in.i have trained in shangdong,korea and america.can leave immediately will travel by train south

  • Ripple on December 20, 2012, 5:24 pm

    Hi Vince, actually there are three Southern Shaolin Monasteries in Fujian in history. There were located in Quanzhou, Putian and Fuqing respectively. The one in Fuqing is known as the legitimate one because the archaeological discovery on Jun 4, 1993 has proved this. For more info, please use google translate to see this page in Baidu Baike. http://baike.baidu.com/view/147761.htm

  • Vince on December 20, 2012, 11:10 am

    I am curious about the location of the Southern Shaolin Monastery. So far I know the Linquan Monastery and another monastery in Quanzhou claim to be the Southern Shaolin Monastery (my friend is convinced that the one in Quanzhou is legitimate, as he said the ruins of the original monastery were found there). As there are these two locations (as well as other claims in Fuzhou and other costal cities in Fujian as well as in Guangzhou), which one is the legitimate one?

  • Ripple on March 24, 2011, 3:04 pm

    Hi, the temple is not ours, it belongs to the monks. If you want to learn Chinese Kung fu, I suggest you go to the Northern Shaolin Temple or the local Kung fu schools in Deng Feng city. We have some tour programs to the Northern Shaolin Temple and the Wudang Mountain, if you are interested in them, we can you some.

  • Nicky on March 24, 2011, 6:52 am

    hi im intereted in training at your temple. Do you have a website here i can see the type of training , and education you do. Thank you.

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